Climb Safe

Features

John Long: Guilty Pleasures
Lynn Hill and I spent the winter of 1981 in Las Vegas, climbing daily at Red Rocks and plowing through nights at dead-end jobs. After roughly 10 seasons of climbing 300 days a year, my learning curve had flattened and I found myself singing the same old song.
The Beast of the East
Remote, unknown and protected by a scarcity of information, Maine's Mount Katahdin, with 4,000 feet of elevation gain, arctic weather and big, bold alpine and rock routes, may be the Northeast's best-kept secret.
Crag Clown
It's fall, but the Red River Gorge is so humid we're all looking for a break from the heat. The lights are finally set for a portrait I'm taking of a big name, 5.14-sending sponsored athlete, when over walks Nelson Carayannis, a climber of considerably less talent and strength. Carayannis, casually gripping a Gatorade bottle, asks if I'm ready.
Altered State
A tricky crux, a surprise pop, a very fast 15-foot descent. I was delighted to find myself dangling from my beloved little blue Metolius. But when doing a quick body inventory, I noted that my left foot was attempting an inward 180. Suddenly, explosively, it hurt like hell. My partner Peter quickly lowered me, winced, and suggested we call an ambulance.
FIXE Anchor Stations
Climbers put A LOT of energy into going up. Coming back down is an afterthought, a fact often reflected in our hodgepodge of raggedy-assed, jury-rigged rappel stations that can range from confusing messes of tat to plant hangers to hardware-store chain and links. For shame!
R & I Photo Galleries