The Masters


Jeff Ward - IFMGA/AMGA Guide

Jeff Ward is an IFMGA-licensed and AMGA-certified Alpine, Ski and Rock Guide. He grew up in the Northwest and is co-owner of North Cascades Mountain Guides (www.ncmountainguides.com) based in Mazama. Ward is a lead instructor for the American Mountain Guides Association and serves on their technical committee.



Martin Volken - IFMGA Guide

Martin Volken is the founder and owner of Pro Guiding Service and Pro Ski and Mountain Service in North Bend, WA. He is a certified IFMGA Swiss Mountain Guide and guides over 120 days per year in North America and Europe as a ski, rock and alpine guide. Volken has pioneered several steep ski descents, ski traverses, alpine and rock routes in the Washington Cascades. He has been a member of the AMGA examiner team since 2000 and has authored and co-authored three books on ski touring and ski mountaineering.

Got a question about climbing? Submit your question in the Ask the Master forum and either Jeff Ward or Martin Volken will supply the answer.

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Short roping on exposed ridges

30-Nov-2016 04:21 PM

Not Available


Posts: 2

Short roping on exposed ridges

I am an experienced alpine climber and have been trained on short-roping by ACMG guides and also have short-roped less-experienced climbers in practice using the typical isolation techniques. However, when climbing in Europe I noticed Swiss guides tend to short rope their clients on very exposed ridges (i.e. Eiger Mittelleggi ridge) without putting necessary protection in place and keep moving free. I was not sure a client fall on a very exposed ridge (sustained 80 degree with 1500m exposure on both sides) would be held easily by the guide no matter how confident the guide is. I would like to know what the guide’s prospective is on those situations.

Thanks

  Reply

01-Dec-2016 05:17 PM

Martin

Martin
Posts: 48

Hi there and good question. 

I will start out by saying that explaining the nuances of short roping in a short paragraph is a tricky thing. The point you are bringing up is a good one for sure and I will concede that sometimes the free and continuous movement in exposed terrain gets taken too far. Keeping the flow of movement going can become a habit that simply gets taken to far. On the other hand there are a lot of subtle clues and tips that get passed on the client non verbally when you are moving together in close proximity. Furthermore are you in a better position of stopping the slip or trip into developing into an outright fall, which is one of the main points of this particular phase of short roping. 

Hope this helps.

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13-Dec-2016 10:07 PM

Not Available


Posts: 2

Thanks Martin for the response. Much appreciated


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