The Masters


Jeff Ward - IFMGA/AMGA Guide

Jeff Ward is an IFMGA-licensed and AMGA-certified Alpine, Ski and Rock Guide. He grew up in the Northwest and is co-owner of North Cascades Mountain Guides (www.ncmountainguides.com) based in Mazama. Ward is a lead instructor for the American Mountain Guides Association and serves on their technical committee.



Martin Volken - IFMGA Guide

Martin Volken is the founder and owner of Pro Guiding Service and Pro Ski and Mountain Service in North Bend, WA. He is a certified IFMGA Swiss Mountain Guide and guides over 120 days per year in North America and Europe as a ski, rock and alpine guide. Volken has pioneered several steep ski descents, ski traverses, alpine and rock routes in the Washington Cascades. He has been a member of the AMGA examiner team since 2000 and has authored and co-authored three books on ski touring and ski mountaineering.

Got a question about climbing? Submit your question in the Ask the Master forum and either Jeff Ward or Martin Volken will supply the answer.

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Snow biv

19-Dec-2016 01:40 PM

arran

arran
Posts: 2

Whats the best snow bivvy given you have skis, poles and a tarp?

Wanting to minimise build time and maximise shelter.

Ive tried a trench with ski lined tarp roof, but there must be a million other ways to do things.

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22-Dec-2016 08:59 AM

Jeff Ward

Jeff Ward
Posts: 34

I think the trench with the tarp roof is probably the fastest and least back breaking, glove soaking versions of snow shelters.  A traditional snow cave is quite good for super cold or super windy conditions but the build can be a real pain and often includes a good glove soaking and some snow down the back of your neck.  

If it's not too cold or windy I'll bring a tent or a megamid-style tarp.  These shelters are getting lighter every year and the time and energy saved at the end of the day is pretty sweet.  

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12-Jan-2017 08:59 PM

Bror

Bror
Posts: 1


The Swedish (Scandinavian?) approach is to use a Windsack. Pretty much a huge sack made of tent fabric. It's considered as essential safety equipment if you do anything in exposed  terrain in the mountains.

http://us.hilleberg.com/EN/shelters/windsack/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf8cVtrF4no

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KagpzGczwZw



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