Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Exploding Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Cysts in Fingers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snapped ankle tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Talus Bone
  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bunions
  • Ice Climbing Injury: Toenail Pressure
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Back: Preventing Hunchback

    04-Feb-2010
    By

    What's up with those rock climbers who look honed as hell, but the minute they step off the rock, they turn into the Hunchback of Notre Dame?

    Grectmeme | Rock and Ice Forum

    Climbers, especially those bloody Young Ones, are generally lazy bums unable to give energy to anything that is not climbing. This includes healthy posture. They slink around, keeping a low profile on the fringe of society. Eventually that posture becomes their identity. The body follows the mind. I could be wrong (but probably not!).

    The other possibility involves the interplay of multifarious biomechanical forces that would take a thesis to explain. Basically it comes down to a chicken or egg situation between pelvic tilt and thoracic curve. In climbers, tight internal rotators at the shoulder, the result of always pulling down, are a likely catalyst by pulling the shoulders down and forward, but even this is far from a given in any particular case.

    Likewise, the solution is wide and varied. The simplest approach is to do yoga (kama sutra!), cross train (defense techniques like Brazilian jujitsu and Oompa Loompa mud wrestling are especially effective), and whenever you remember: Chin in, tits out!

     

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