Body

  • Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Body: Injury Truths
  • Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Body: Chronic Injury
  • Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Shoulder: Separation
  • Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

    No items found.

    Elbow

  • Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Elbow: DR. J's Dodgy Elbows
  • Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Stressed-Out Fingers
  • Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Stressed-Out Fingers
  • Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Fingers: Flappers
  • Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Fingers: Cysts
  • Fingers: Arthritis
  • Fingers: Numbness
  • Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Feet: Broken Foot
  • Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Feet: Toe Fracture
  • Video Spotlight
    EMILY DUDLEY _ FAs in RED FEATHER, CO
    EMILY DUDLEY _ FAs in RED FEATHER, CO

    Body: Injury Truths

    18-Jun-2010
    By

    Is it possible to climb all the time and not get injured?

    Andrew Bisharat, Carbondale, Colorado

     

    Nope, I don't believe so! The fact that climbers have arms resembling sculpted titanium rods is a good indication of the stresses they endure. Hanging onto a cliff, not infrequently risking a perfectly good set of ankles, is a great way to generate strength. It is also a great way to self-combust. Eye-popping, tendon-ripping and, at times, bone-fracturing feats of power are for some climbers just party tricks. Fear is the catalyst of physiologic mayhem. The flip side of the coin is where pain becomes background noise only, and every contractile tissue available moves you upward an inch at a time. Tap into this dark well of strength often enough, and you learn to do it without the adrenalin. You naively reset the many cerebral and physiological emergency brakes until they are barely a hindrance. The strange thing is that climbers are always surprised when something snaps.

     

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