Table of Contents
  • Ancient Tonics
  • Are Homemade Draws Reliable?
  • Avoiding Arthritis
  • Avoiding Injury
  • Basic Aid Technique
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 1
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 2
  • Climbing Anchor and Belay Stations
  • Climbing Photography How To
  • Climbing Protection
  • Free Climbing Tips: Why Get Stronger When You Can Get Better?
  • How to Avoid Belayer's Neck
  • How to Belay for Climbing
  • How to Choose Climbing Equipment
  • How to Climb on Lead
  • How to Climb on Toprope
  • How to Rappel
  • How to Rig an Anchor for a Novice
  • How To Rig Trad Anchors/Belays
  • How to Toprope
  • How to Train for Rock climbing
  • Keep 'er Wild - Leave No Trace Tips for Rock Climbers
  • Respecting the Climbing Environment
  • Rest ... or Else
  • Rock Climbing Accident: Bolt Pulls Out in the New River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Anti-inflammatory Foods vs NSAIDS
  • Rock Climbing Training: Gain Confidence by Learning Not to Fear Falling
  • Rock Climbing Training: Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Rock Climbing Training: Never Get Pumped Again
  • Rock Climbing Training: Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Snow Travel: Skills for Climbing, Hiking, and Crossing Over Snow
  • The Climbing Dictionary
  • The First Sport
  • The Intuitive Approach to Training
  • THE PERFECT 5-MINUTE WARM-UP FOR CLIMBERS
  • The Rock and Ice Survey of Your Body, Mind and Soul
  • Understanding Climbing Ratings and Grades
  • Winter Workouts
  • Witness the Mental Fitness
  • Are Homemade Draws Reliable?
  • Avoiding Arthritis
  • Avoiding Injury
  • Basic Aid Technique
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 1
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 2
  • How to Belay for Climbing
  • How to Choose Climbing Equipment
  • How to Climb on Lead
  • How to Climb on Toprope
  • How to Rappel
  • How to Rig an Anchor for a Novice
  • How To Rig Trad Anchors/Belays
  • How to Toprope
  • How to Train for Rock climbing
  • Keep 'er Wild - Leave No Trace Tips for Rock Climbers
  • Respecting the Climbing Environment
  • Rock Climbing Accident: Bolt Pulls Out in the New River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Anti-inflammatory Foods vs NSAIDS
  • Rock Climbing Training: Avoiding the Gear-Placement Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Beating the Lactic Acid Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Best Ratio of Resting to Bouldering
  • Rock Climbing Training: Boost Power With Eccentric Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Can Old Guys Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Do Forearm Trainers Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Creatine Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Running or Biking Improve Your Climbing?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Dynamic vs. Static Stretching
  • Rock Climbing Training: Euro Training Secrets
  • Rock Climbing Training: Gain Confidence by Learning Not to Fear Falling
  • Rock Climbing Training: Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Rock Climbing Training: Getting Strong After a Layoff
  • Rock Climbing Training: How Often Should You Rest?
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Beat Fear
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Develop Sloper Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Mentally Train
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Power Train for Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Prevent Bonking
  • Rock Climbing Training: How To Recover On Route
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Stay Psyched
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Unlock a Crux
  • Rock Climbing Training: HowTo Use Microcycles
  • Rock Climbing Training: Improving Slab Technique
  • Rock Climbing Training: Is Protein Important?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximizing a Small Home Wall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximum Training in Minimum Time
  • Rock Climbing Training: Never Get Pumped Again
  • Rock Climbing Training: Overcome Anxiety and Send!
  • Rock Climbing Training: Periodized Training For the Year-round Approach
  • Rock Climbing Training: Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Training: Recovery Supplement Truths
  • Rock Climbing Training: Regaining Confidence After a Fall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Resting the Perfect Amount
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Add Weight or Use Smaller Holds on a Hangboard
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Lose Weight or Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Importance of Finger Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Secrets of Warming Up
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Rock Climbing Training: Tips for Better Onsighting
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training During Pregnancy
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training While Hungry
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training With an Injury
  • Rock Climbing Training: Ultimate Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: Using a Weight Belt For Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Warming Up Without Warm-Ups
  • The First Sport
  • The Intuitive Approach to Training
  • THE PERFECT 5-MINUTE WARM-UP FOR CLIMBERS
  • Training for Climbing: Injured? Train Your Core!
  • Understanding Climbing Ratings and Grades
  • Winter Workouts
  • Witness the Mental Fitness
  • Are Homemade Draws Reliable?
  • Cam Care and Maintenance Guide
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 1
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 2
  • Climbing Anchor and Belay Stations
  • Climbing Photography How To
  • Climbing Protection
  • Free Climbing Tips: Why Get Stronger When You Can Get Better?
  • How to Belay for Climbing
  • How to Choose Climbing Equipment
  • How to Climb on Lead
  • How to Climb on Toprope
  • How to Rappel
  • How to Rig an Anchor for a Novice
  • How To Rig Trad Anchors/Belays
  • How to Toprope
  • How to Train for Rock climbing
  • Keep 'er Wild - Leave No Trace Tips for Rock Climbers
  • Respecting the Climbing Environment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Training: Beating the Lactic Acid Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Best Ratio of Resting to Bouldering
  • Rock Climbing Training: Boost Power With Eccentric Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Can Old Guys Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Do Forearm Trainers Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Creatine Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Running or Biking Improve Your Climbing?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Dynamic vs. Static Stretching
  • Rock Climbing Training: Euro Training Secrets
  • Rock Climbing Training: Gain Confidence by Learning Not to Fear Falling
  • Rock Climbing Training: Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Rock Climbing Training: Getting Strong After a Layoff
  • Rock Climbing Training: How Often Should You Rest?
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Beat Fear
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Develop Sloper Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Mentally Train
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Power Train for Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Prevent Bonking
  • Rock Climbing Training: How To Recover On Route
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Stay Psyched
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Unlock a Crux
  • Rock Climbing Training: HowTo Use Microcycles
  • Rock Climbing Training: Improving Slab Technique
  • Rock Climbing Training: Is Protein Important?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximizing a Small Home Wall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximum Training in Minimum Time
  • Rock Climbing Training: Overcome Anxiety and Send!
  • Rock Climbing Training: Periodized Training For the Year-round Approach
  • Rock Climbing Training: Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Training: Recovery Supplement Truths
  • Rock Climbing Training: Regaining Confidence After a Fall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Resting the Perfect Amount
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Add Weight or Use Smaller Holds on a Hangboard
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Lose Weight or Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Importance of Finger Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Secrets of Warming Up
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Rock Climbing Training: Tips for Better Onsighting
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training During Pregnancy
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training While Hungry
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training With an Injury
  • Rock Climbing Training: Ultimate Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: Using a Weight Belt For Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Warming Up Without Warm-Ups
  • The Climbing Dictionary
  • The First Sport
  • THE PERFECT 5-MINUTE WARM-UP FOR CLIMBERS
  • Training for Climbing: Injured? Train Your Core!
  • Understanding Climbing Ratings and Grades
  • Winter Workouts
  • Witness the Mental Fitness
  • Avoiding Arthritis
  • Avoiding Injury
  • Climb Safe: Spotting for Bouldering
  • Climbing Photography How To
  • Free Climbing Tips: Why Get Stronger When You Can Get Better?
  • Keep 'er Wild - Leave No Trace Tips for Rock Climbers
  • Knee: ACL Reconstruction
  • Respecting the Climbing Environment
  • Rest ... or Else
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Anti-inflammatory Foods vs NSAIDS
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Eating Your Way to Better Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: Beating the Lactic Acid Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Best Ratio of Resting to Bouldering
  • Rock Climbing Training: Boost Power With Eccentric Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Can Old Guys Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Do Forearm Trainers Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Creatine Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Running or Biking Improve Your Climbing?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Dynamic vs. Static Stretching
  • Rock Climbing Training: Euro Training Secrets
  • Rock Climbing Training: Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Rock Climbing Training: Getting Strong After a Layoff
  • Rock Climbing Training: How Often Should You Rest?
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Beat Fear
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Develop Sloper Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Mentally Train
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Power Train for Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Prevent Bonking
  • Rock Climbing Training: How To Recover On Route
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Stay Psyched
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Unlock a Crux
  • Rock Climbing Training: HowTo Use Microcycles
  • Rock Climbing Training: Improving Slab Technique
  • Rock Climbing Training: Is Protein Important?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximizing a Small Home Wall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximum Training in Minimum Time
  • Rock Climbing Training: Overcome Anxiety and Send!
  • Rock Climbing Training: Periodized Training For the Year-round Approach
  • Rock Climbing Training: Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Training: Recovery Supplement Truths
  • Rock Climbing Training: Regaining Confidence After a Fall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Resting the Perfect Amount
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Add Weight or Use Smaller Holds on a Hangboard
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Lose Weight or Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Importance of Finger Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Secrets of Warming Up
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training During Pregnancy
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training While Hungry
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training With an Injury
  • Rock Climbing Training: Ultimate Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: Using a Weight Belt For Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Warming Up Without Warm-Ups
  • The Climbing Dictionary
  • The First Sport
  • The Intuitive Approach to Training
  • THE PERFECT 5-MINUTE WARM-UP FOR CLIMBERS
  • Training for Climbing: Injured? Train Your Core!
  • Understanding Climbing Ratings and Grades
  • Winter Workouts
  • Witness the Mental Fitness
  • Are Homemade Draws Reliable?
  • Avoiding Arthritis
  • Avoiding Injury
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 1
  • Climb Safe: Belaying Part 2
  • Climbing Anchor and Belay Stations
  • Climbing Photography How To
  • Free Climbing Tips: Why Get Stronger When You Can Get Better?
  • How to Belay for Climbing
  • How to Choose Climbing Equipment
  • How to Climb on Lead
  • How to Climb on Toprope
  • How to Rappel
  • How to Rig an Anchor for a Novice
  • How to Toprope
  • How to Train for Rock climbing
  • Keep 'er Wild - Leave No Trace Tips for Rock Climbers
  • Respecting the Climbing Environment
  • Rest ... or Else
  • Rock Climbing Accident: Bolt Pulls Out in the New River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Anti-inflammatory Foods vs NSAIDS
  • Rock Climbing Nutrition: Eating Your Way to Better Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: Avoiding the Gear-Placement Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Beating the Lactic Acid Pump
  • Rock Climbing Training: Best Ratio of Resting to Bouldering
  • Rock Climbing Training: Boost Power With Eccentric Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Can Old Guys Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Do Forearm Trainers Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Creatine Work?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Does Running or Biking Improve Your Climbing?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Dynamic vs. Static Stretching
  • Rock Climbing Training: Euro Training Secrets
  • Rock Climbing Training: Gain Confidence by Learning Not to Fear Falling
  • Rock Climbing Training: Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Rock Climbing Training: Getting Strong After a Layoff
  • Rock Climbing Training: How Often Should You Rest?
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Beat Fear
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Develop Sloper Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Mentally Train
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Power Train for Climbing
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Prevent Bonking
  • Rock Climbing Training: How To Recover On Route
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Stay Psyched
  • Rock Climbing Training: How to Unlock a Crux
  • Rock Climbing Training: HowTo Use Microcycles
  • Rock Climbing Training: Improving Slab Technique
  • Rock Climbing Training: Is Protein Important?
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximizing a Small Home Wall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Maximum Training in Minimum Time
  • Rock Climbing Training: Never Get Pumped Again
  • Rock Climbing Training: Overcome Anxiety and Send!
  • Rock Climbing Training: Periodized Training For the Year-round Approach
  • Rock Climbing Training: Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Training: Recovery Supplement Truths
  • Rock Climbing Training: Regaining Confidence After a Fall
  • Rock Climbing Training: Resting the Perfect Amount
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Add Weight or Use Smaller Holds on a Hangboard
  • Rock Climbing Training: Should You Lose Weight or Get Stronger?
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Importance of Finger Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Secrets of Warming Up
  • Rock Climbing Training: The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Rock Climbing Training: Tips for Better Onsighting
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training During Pregnancy
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training While Hungry
  • Rock Climbing Training: Training With an Injury
  • Rock Climbing Training: Ultimate Strength
  • Rock Climbing Training: Using a Weight Belt For Training
  • Rock Climbing Training: Warming Up Without Warm-Ups
  • The Climbing Dictionary
  • The First Sport
  • The Intuitive Approach to Training
  • THE PERFECT 5-MINUTE WARM-UP FOR CLIMBERS
  • Training for Climbing: Injured? Train Your Core!
  • Understanding Climbing Ratings and Grades
  • Winter Workouts
  • Witness the Mental Fitness
  •  
    Video Spotlight
    Connecticut Bouldering
    Connecticut Bouldering

    Climbing Anchor and Belay Stations

    20-Nov-2009
    By

    The rules for placing gear for anchor stations, whether for lead or toprope situations are no different from those that apply to placing gear on lead, but the consequences of failure are usually more severe. Anchor stations must be bombproof and secure from any directional pull-down, out and up.

    How you construct a station depends on the available cracks, the rack you have and the availability of fixed gear. The textbook belay has three or more separate, cam-and-nut-eating cracks, or three large bolts. Real-life anchors are seldom so convenient. Often, your anchor will consist of a bit of everything - a couple of nuts, a cam, and, on popular routes, a fixed pin or bolt - strung across the stance. To a large extent, the nature of the cracks and fixed gear will dictate what you can arrange, but you should still try to set the gear so each piece complements the other. Place a multi-directional cam, for example, to keep anchors, like nuts, from being pulled up and out. String everything together so it is equalized, that is, each piece bears an equal load.

    anchor-spacing
    The farther apart the anchors, the greater the load on each anchor. Use slings to keep the angle formed at the clim-in point less than 60degrees.

    Anchor Spacing

    The horizontal distance between each of your anchor placements and the length of the slings you use to connect them are as important, if not more so, than the method you use to equalize the anchors. This is because as you spread anchors apart horizontally, they pull sharply against one another, lever style, multiplying the force instead of reducing it. The farther apart the anchors, the greater the potential load multiplication.

    In any belay- or rappel-anchor situation, arrange the anchors so the angle formed by the slings at the master-connection point is less than 60 degrees. At this angle, the load on each equalized anchor is 58 percent. Increase that angle to 90 degrees, and the load on each anchor increases to 70 percent. Go up to 150 degrees, a realistic scenario when connecting anchors with short slings, and the load on each anchor can reach 200 percent!

    The good news is that you can use slings to extend the anchors, keeping the angle formed between the slings at 60 degrees or less.

     

    Redundancy

    You have two kidneys for a reason: The organ is mission critical. If you only had one kidney and it conked out, the mission - your life - would end. Redundant systems keep the game going even when one component fails. Belays are mission critical: Double up all key components. Even the best equalized anchor is junk if you clip to the master point with just one carabiner, and that carabiner breaks (it has happened). Use two carabiners, ideally locking ones, to connect yourself to the master point. Likewise, double up all critical slings, and compound your anchor by placing three (or more) cams or nuts instead of two, and backing up fixed gear, pins and old bolts.

     

    sliding-x
    The sliding x (left) effectively equalizes anchors, but causes shock loading should one of the anchors fail. The improved sliding x (right) is better because it limits shcok loading.

    Sliding X

    When you take a sling, give it a half-twist and clip through the twist you create the Sliding X, a common, simple and highly effective equalization method for two anchors that has the additional benefit of being the only system that readjusts itself when the angle of loading changes. Nevertheless, it is not recommended. The single sling is not redundant, and if either anchor point fails, the remaining piece is subject to a shock-load of up to two tons, depending on the distance between the two anchors.

    ==

    Improved Sliding X

    Tie an overhand loop in both sides of the sling or cord above the X , and you dramatically decrease the shock-load potential. The trade off: The closer you tie the overhand knots to the X, the more you reduce the system's ability to equalize. Despite this limitation, the Improved X is good alternative when you are low on slings. It is also a good method for equalizing pro on lead, and equalizing two anchors that are in turn woven into a cordelette-rigged belay.

    slings
    Slings also work to equalize an anchor, but are difficult to adjust, and can cause uneven loading when the direction of the fall pulls the main clip-in point off center.

    Slings

    Piecing together an anchor by using a sundry of slings remains popular, and when used properly, sling anchors can equalize. The system is also redundant, works with an infinite number of anchors, and has a low risk of shock-loading.

    For slings to equalize, their lengths must be precisely adjusted by adding slings to lengthen or tying overhand knots to shorten them. With all this guesswork and fiddling, you'll seldom end up with a truly equalized anchor. One sling is nearly always a bit longer than the other, causing uneven loading. Even when you do get the anchor adjusted just right, the load is only equalized when it pulls straight down on the power point. If the load pulls off to either side, it will not be equalized. A final consideration is the fact that perlon and slings all stretch differently, resulting in potentially unequal anchor loading.

    cordelette
    No anchor construction is perfect, but the cordelette is as good as it gets, offering easy rigging and some equalization.

    Cordelette

    For simplicity, redundancy, ease of use and low-potential shock loading, the cordelette is the gold standard for equalizing anchors. Use a dedicated 9-foot loop of 7 or 8mm perlon (some companies make perlon just for cordelettes; other manufacturers offer cordelettes pre-made from webbing); clip each anchor into the loop, pull down the length of cordelette between each anchor, gather these to an equalized point, and tie them together with a figure-eight loop. The resulting loops formed by the figure-eight become the power-point. The crux to properly setting a cordelette is guessing the direction the anchor will be loaded. For instance, if you know the anchor will be loaded off to the left, tie the cordelette so the power point is off to the left. Since a cordelette only equalizes in one direction, you need to get this right. Guess wrong, and just one piece will bear the brunt of the load.

    Properly rigged, the cordelette will equalize the anchors; should one point fail, shock-loading will be minimal. To further protect against an unanticipated off-center loading, place a directional anchor such as an upside-down slotted nut and clip this to the power-point loop.

    double-figure-8
    If you don't have a cordelette, the rope and a double figure-eight can work to equalize two anchors.

    Double Figure-Eight

    When you arrive at a belay and don't have a single sling or cordelette to construct your anchor, you can simply use your rope and the Double Figure-Eight to equalize two anchors. Although the knot is difficult to adjust such that the two anchors share the load exactly, the Double Figure-Eight, when you get it right, works well, and has a low shock-load risk. It does, however, eat up rope, especially when your anchors are spread far apart, and only works for two-point anchors. When you have three pieces in, and assuming you have a sling, you can clip the third anchor to one of the Double Figure-Eight's loops, adjusting the sling to the appropriate equalized length.

    Reader's Commentary:

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    Add Your Comments to this article:
    Luke Jackson commented on 14-Sep-2013 12:31 AM3 out of 5 stars
    In the first picture isn't the carabiner being loaded tri-axially? There's a separate runner from each bolt being clipped into one middle carabiner, leaving the carabiner being pulled in three directions instead of just along the spine. Is this safe?
    Scott Isaacman commented on 26-Feb-2014 10:32 AM4 out of 5 stars
    Nice, but a few comments:
    1) Got to kid you about the kidneys. Your logic is faulty selecting the kidney as an example. Why not two hearts? The redundancy statements are good and don't need the kidney example.
    2) The sliding X requires judgement. There are times when it is useful or even needed. It is good that you reviewed some of the ways for making it safer. The person setting the anchor should also consider some other factors. How far apart are the hangars? Let's pretend the climber is going to use a nylon sling (better for example because its stretch will produce less of a shock load than a static cord or a dynema sling). How far will it extend if one hangar pulls out? How likely is the hangar to pull out? Point is, there is much to consider and the X should not be routinely condemned.
    Hello