Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Open-Heart Surgery
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Replacement
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Exploding Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Golfer's Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Synovial Chips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: TFCC Tear
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Left Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Avulsion Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Pinky Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Finger Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Alternative to Pulley Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • Rock Climbing Injury: First Pulley Strain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Cysts in Fingers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Blown Knees
  • Rock Climbing Injury: MCL Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snapped ankle tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Talus Bone
  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bunions
  • Ice Climbing Injury: Toenail Pressure
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Bouldering in Ubatuba
    Bouldering in Ubatuba

    Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture

    04-Dec-2009
    By

    I use a campus board for a quick pump when time is limited. I also campus easier problems for some added strength. However, lately, after five minutes or so of training, I get this aching along the ulnar side of my forearm. It feels like my bone is aching. The pain is about halfway between wrist and elbow. It hurts mostly when I am pulling hard, not so much when dead-hanging on jugs. It isn't too bad at night unless I had an evening session. The pain is there when I am on the problem but it's when I release the holds that I feel the ache. I had the same pain when I used to do bicep curls at the gym.

    Cameron Whitehead | Rumney, NH

    Stress fractures are the injuries of cool people, that special breed able to tap dark wells of moonshine mojo to the point that their bones yield under the cumulative and crushing force of full-throttle commitment. Stress fractures are more recalcitrant than politicians from Texas, equally painful, and even less likely to respond in a reasonable manner when under duress.

    Time-poor training translates to injury-rich training. You can't just rock up to the gym for a quick tango with that bush-pig the campus board; it will eat you and not bother to floss. You need to take your time -- pick your nose, stare at the new breed of hot chicks that have way more technique than you, comb your eyebrows.

    Rather than campus easier problems, use your feet on a more difficult one! Foot free is for those with no left brain. If you don't have time to train properly, go home and have a beer -- it will be better for you.

    For the most part, ulna stress fractures occur in the avid weight lifter, so it's no surprise that you initially felt this at the gym. Exercises such as biceps curls generate enormous stress on the forearm bones, especially the ulna.

    As you have noted, pain arises in the mid-ulna shaft, temporarily worsens with exercise, and is often very painful if you suddenly release your grip. Stress fractures in general are acutely sensitive to vibration.

    Scans would be great, but there seems little doubt that you are on the wrong end of the bone-stress spectrum. If you are the persnickety type, x-rays may be helpful, but an MRI (among other scans) will be defining.

    Absolute rest for a few weeks is paramount, and then adjust your training to minimize stress. Light climbing is fine, but no weights that involve gripping. If you can't apply a gentle hand brake or the training is still aggravating, then take 10 weeks of absolute rest and start back slowly.

    Comfrey cream has been shown to be fairly helpful in fracture healing. And it's cheap with no adverse side effects.

    Most GPs and even physical therapists are unlikely to have heard of an ulna stress fracture, but are certainly capable of recognizing the condition if they follow through with appropriate scans. A sports physician (a specialist in sports medicine) would be preferable.

     

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Elbows and Wrists: Tendonitis and Tendonisis

    Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping

    Elbow Pain and Hangboarding

    Elbow Stress Fracture

    Elbow Tendonisis

    Elbow Tingling and Numbness

    Elbow: Minimizing Fingerboarding Injuries

    Wrist Instability and Carpal Tunnel

    Wrist Fracture

    Hands Dupuytren's Disease

    Hand Numbness 

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