Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Open-Heart Surgery
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Replacement
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Exploding Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Golfer's Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Synovial Chips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: TFCC Tear
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Left Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Avulsion Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Pinky Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Finger Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Alternative to Pulley Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • Rock Climbing Injury: First Pulley Strain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Cysts in Fingers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Blown Knees
  • Rock Climbing Injury: MCL Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snapped ankle tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Talus Bone
  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bunions
  • Ice Climbing Injury: Toenail Pressure
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries

    29-Jan-2010
    By

    I use an old Pusher Powerjunkie hang board and I'm concerned about the angled geometry of the main jugs. In the past I have had elbow problems. Is it bad to do pull-ups on grips that are not horizontal? Do you think that this setup could have a negative effect on my elbows? Is it healthier to have the grips set up horizontally as most other hang boards do?

    boredEnuf | Rock and Ice Forum

    I hate hang boarding. Aside from some vague mechanical similarities, it is everything that climbing isn't. Did I mention the brain-numbing boredom? That said, I bore quite easily. And I'm weak ...

    Hang boarding is the fodder of finger strength. Muscle strength, as opposed to tendon strength, develops faster than it took the conservatives to denounce Obama's veggie patch as heretical environmentalism. When the holds are angled rather than horizontal, your wrists are cocked to the outside. This causes excessive loading of flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) -- the drama queen of your musculoskeletal system.

    The moonshine of modern training, hang boarding can be the distillation of chronic finger overload. FCU is tempestuous by nature and this training method has the propensity to catapult you into tendonosis. Training on angled holds is not so much poking funny faces at FCU as it is punching it in the nose.

    Many studies have shown that strength and stability are maximized in neutral. Sonnie Trotter had similar issues with angled holds and outlines as much in his blog. Theory, and anecdotal evidence like yours and Sonnie's would suggest that anything outside of neutral is more inclined to cause an elbow tantrum.

    The distance between the holds is also a factor. A very wide or narrow grip will push the wrist out of neutral and invite punitive damages. Horizontal holds on a standard width board are the way to go.

    Like animals low on the food chain, your elbows have an aversion to surprises. If you can't design or follow a program properly, pay someone to help you. It will be cheaper and less painful than rehab.

    Pull-ups alone are a complete waste of time. Pull-ups on a board are a close second. Think beyond the box. For example, erect an easel several feet behind your board. Tape a paintbrush to your toe. Now hang from your beloved board, pull into a front lever, and paint a portrait of your favorite celebrity. I am good at dead presidents and porn stars since they are fairly ugly anyway.

     

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Elbows and Wrists: Tendonitis and Tendonisis

    Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping

    Elbow Pain and Hangboarding

    Elbow Stress Fracture

    Elbow Tendonisis

    Elbow Tingling and Numbness

    Elbow: Minimizing Fingerboarding Injuries

    Wrist Instability and Carpal Tunnel

    Wrist Fracture

    Hands Dupuytren's Disease

    Hand Numbness 

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