Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

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    Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Humboldt State Climbing Team
    Humboldt State Climbing Team

    Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

    09-Apr-2010
    By

    I have developed a moderate pain in the extensor tendons of the thumb: abductor pollicis longus (APL) and the extensor pollicis brevis (EPB). The pain became intense after a bouldering session on plastic. I was diagnosed with . I stopped climbing at the gym four weeks ago, and since then have only done a couple of moderate trad climbs with my hand taped to avoid any stretching of the tendons. I also avoided using my thumb. The treatment has included taking ibuprofen, and multiple sessions with the PT using a steroid gel applied with ultrasound targeting the area. I have applied ice multiple times a day and wear a removable splint often. The problem is slowly getting better, although in the morning the pain is a lot more intense. Is there anything else I can do to help speed healing? Should I not climb until all the pain in the tendons is completely gone?

    Ernesto Trujillo, Fort Collins, Colorado

    De Quervain's is an inflammatory disorder of the synovial sheaths that the APL and EPB tendons glide through. Ironically, the sheaths are there to reduce frictional force, but when aggravated, they become inflamed.

    I have to say I am not a fan of splinting for any condition unless absolutely necessary. Like U.S. foreign aid, there is much hoopla, followed by enormous problems and infrequent good outcomes.

    I have never splinted someone or had recovery go beyond a couple of weeks. Splinting should not be frontline, but is certainly a worthy arrow if all else fails to hit the mark.

    Likewise, pharmaceutical intervention is not the vanguard of medicine for musculoskeletal disorders. That said, cortisone would be of assistance, at least in the short term. This assumes that you've cut out aggravating activities, and addressed musculoskeletal factors, and that it is minor aggravations that are maintaining the inflammation.

    For inflammatory conditions, ultrasound is pointless. It is assumed to have thermal and mechanical effects on the target tissue, and supposedly increases local metabolism, circulation and tissue regeneration. Maybe it does, but not significantly. Certainly it does not have some mystical, difficult-to-comprehend property that you, the na¿ve consumer, should be happy to pay for. Ultrasound is, however, a beautifully constructed placebo, used by roughly 95 percent of physical therapists. Placebo! Cocaine would be equally helpful, more enjoyable and competitively priced depending on U.S. relations with Colombia.

    De Quervain's is usually a repetitive-strain type of injury, arising after several hours of aggravating activity. Climbing is not typically a catalyst, though it may maintain the injury. Pinches often exacerbate it; most everything else does not. Ironically, trying to guard the thumb by lifting it out of the way can cause more aggravation than using it.

    Gaming consoles, some computer mouses, using a wrench for hours, and other repetitive activities can initiate the pathology, but it is easily maintained by activities that would not start the process.

    In De Quervain's the extensor muscles are likely to become chronically inflamed and rather pissed (that's a diagnostic term). A stern massage often helps, as it does for many musculoskeletal conditions. Heat on the muscle bellies in the upper forearm, and ice over the lower inflamed area can be helpful.

     

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Arthritis

    Blown Tendons

    Cortisone and Tendon Injuries

    Cracked Fingertips

    Finger Cysts

    Finger Cysts and Pain

    Finger Electrostimulation

    Flappers

    Grip Position and Injury

    Hyper-Extended Finger

    NSAID Treatment

    Finger Numbness

    Pinky Finger Pain

    Finger Stiffness and Soreness

    Finger Taping Truths

    Torn A2 Finger Pulley

    Torn A3 and A4 Finger Pulleys

    Trigger Thumb Syndrome

    Trigger Finger Syndrome

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