Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Exploding Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Cysts in Fingers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bunions
  • Ice Climbing Injury: Toenail Pressure
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley

    04-Feb-2010
    By

    I was pulling on a big sloper with my feet way under me when I felt a crunch and heard a pop in my middle finger between my knuckle in my hand and the first joint in my finger. It immediately hurt (but not a ton) and later there was swelling. I took ibuprofen and iced it. Before bed I taped it to keep the swelling down. Today the pain is not as localized, but is an overall ache in my hand. The same thing happened several months ago. What gives?

    Tracy Wilson | Carbondale, CO

    It's cool to be special, and snapping an A2 pulley in an open-hand position rather than a crimp is special indeed. The hold must have been reasonably angled such that you were flexing the metacarpophalangeal joints (the ones at the base of your fingers, just inside your palm). The popping noise, pain and swelling pattern probably means the full monty: ruptured.

    Clearly you have been on the rough seas for a wee while. Tearing a second pulley (or the same one) in such a short time is not so much a wake-up call as it is a torpedo barreling through your porthole -- something is amiss.

    Generating sufficient force in this position to rupture a healthy pulley is unlikely. Which places you in one of two scenarios. Option 1: You have been marauding through the Land of Overtraining and the incumbent warlord has sliced you up. He is toying with you. Get the fuck out of there! Option 2: You are a mutant languishing in the Age of Stupid, with the voracious bite of a T-rex but the brains of an anemone. In other words, you are biting off more than you can chew. Jump the evolutionary queue and start a training program.

    Stretch out your joints so as to allow even loading of the pulleys. When a finger joint is tight and accessory motions like shearing are reduced, the pulley can be unevenly loaded along its length, precipitating a tear from the end of more load. There is a stretching video on my web page (drjuliansaunders.com). There is also an article on taping that will help you manage your return to climbing. The month it will take to repair this pulley is less of a concern than the months it will take to properly strengthen all of them.

     

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Arthritis

    Blown Tendons

    Cortisone and Tendon Injuries

    Cracked Fingertips

    Finger Cysts

    Finger Cysts and Pain

    De Quervains Tenosynovitis

    Finger Electrostimulation

    Flappers

    Grip Position and Injury

    Hyper-Extended Finger

    NSAID Treatment

    Finger Numbness

    Pinky Finger Pain

    Finger Stiffness and Soreness

    Finger Taping Truths

    Torn A3 and A4 Finger Pulleys

    Trigger Thumb Syndrome

    Trigger Finger Syndrome

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