• Beat the Burnout: Only Ondra Should Train Like Ondra
  • Effective Gym Training Strategies (for Route Climbing)
  • Should You Add Weight or Use Smaller Holds on a Hangboard
  • Map Out a Plan with the Radar System
  • Managing the Fear of Falling
  • Projecting 101 – 6 Tips For Sending
  • Slowing the Pump Clock
  • Training on the Go
  • How to Train for Compression
  • Nutrition: Eating Your Way to Better Climbing
  • How to Dyno
  • General Conditioning for Climbers
  • Transitioning from Gym to Crag
  • How to Keep Your Job and Family and Still Climb at Your Limit
  • Staying Strong to Perform Your Best All Season
  • How to Lose Weight for Climbing
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 7
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 6
  • Building a Better Climber: Final Part
  • Building a Better Climber - The Rock and Ice Training Series
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 5
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 4
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 3
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 2
  • Building a Better Climber: Part 1
  • Gain Confidence by Learning Not to Fear Falling
  • The Unnatural Way to Climb
  • Get Better When You Are Scared and Pumped
  • Never Get Pumped Again
  • Pushing Past Your Training Plateau
  • How to Power Train for Climbing
  • How to Mentally Train
  • Boost Power With Eccentric Training
  • Tips for Better Onsighting
  • Should You Lose Weight or Get Stronger?
  • Is Protein Important?
  • Getting Strong After a Layoff
  • Does Running or Biking Improve Your Climbing?
  • Training While Hungry
  • How To Use Microcycles
  • Improving Slab Technique
  • How to Unlock a Crux
  • Using Your Hangboard the Right Way
  • Using a Weight Belt For Training
  • Training During Pregnancy
  • Maximizing a Small Home Wall
  • How to Stay Psyched
  • How to Prevent Bonking
  • Best Ratio of Resting to Bouldering
  • The Importance of Finger Strength
  • Regaining Confidence After a Fall
  • Overcome Anxiety and Send!
  • Maximum Training in Minimum Time
  • Dynamic vs. Static Stretching
  • Do Forearm Trainers Work?
  • Ultimate Strength
  • The Secrets of Warming Up
  • Periodized Training For the Year-round Approach
  • Resting the Perfect Amount
  • How To Recover On Route
  • Does Creatine Work?
  • Recovery Supplement Truths
  • Euro Training Secrets
  • Can Old Guys Get Stronger?
  • Training With an Injury
  • How to Beat Fear
  • How Often Should You Rest?
  • Warming Up Without Warm-Ups
  • How to Develop Sloper Strength
  • Beating the Lactic Acid Pump
  • Video Spotlight
    Choke Hold, Independence Pass, CO
    Choke Hold, Independence Pass, CO

    Rock Climbing Training: Maximizing a Small Home Wall

    02-Feb-2010
    By

    Can you outline a training regimen for the home-wall climber?

    —Julian Katz | Saint Louis, MO

    It is a myth that you need tons of space to train effectively for climbing and most true connoisseurs favor something small that has been engineered specifically for their own requirements over a commercial facility that never quite hits the spot. If your redpoint project for next season is a 45-move crimp fest, you don't need me to tell you what to screw onto your home wall.

    Before I get too manic about home walls I want to be clear that they must be well made. In brief, the minimum overall dimensions should be 6 by 8 feet, with the optimal dimensions being 10 by 12 feet. Use a combination of wooden holds and varied, ergonomic resin holds. Don't skimp on cost. The holds are the main thing that determine how fun and effective the wall will be. Make sure each area of the board has a variety of different types and sizes so that you can freely set problems or circuits. In terms of angles, you want a wall between 25 and 50 degrees overhanging. Place the wall somewhere dry and airy with good light, as motivation will slacken in a damp, gloomy cupboard-sized space.

    In terms of how to train, the first step is to carve your workouts up into strength and endurance. For strength sessions, hard boulder problems are always the way forward. Do some easy movement to warm up and then try problems of increasing difficulty, taking plenty of rest to avoid a flash pump. To add some structure, try switching from crimpy problems on small positive holds to slopey problems on larger rounded holds. Divide your problems up, as if setting exercises for a weight-training routine. For example, three sets of under-cuts, side-pulls and so on. You can also make up rules to increase the specific training effect of each problem: hold each move statically for three or four seconds, or cut loose with your feet and replace them before making the next move. A weight belt is a useful accessory to increase the resistance for this type of training.

    For endurance, long circuits are the key, but you can change your approach depending on whether you are doing mid-length power-endurance (20 to 60 moves) or longer stamina circuits (80 to 150 moves).

    For power-endurance the best approach is to pre-plan the circuit so that it is sustained (every move approximately the same grade). For stamina, it is usually sufficient to climb around at random. You will probably need to return to a decent rest to shake out and recover, so include jugs or an adjacent wall at a lower angle. In terms of difficulty, you should train on something that only just enables you to complete a target number of sets, perhaps burning out on the final or penultimate set. Use the guidelines given below as an approximate guide for numbers of repetitions and recovery times.

    • 20 moves x 8-9 sets with 8-min. rest
    • 40 moves x 6-7 sets with 10-min. rest
    • 60 moves x 5-6 sets with 12-min. rest
    • 80 moves x 4-5 sets with 14-min. rest
    • 100 moves x 3-4 sets with 16-min. rest

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