Body

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Open-Heart Surgery
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Injury Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Chronic Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Rock climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder Replacement
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Exploding Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Separation
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Golfer's Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Synovial Chips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • Rock Climbing Injury: TFCC Tear
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Hand
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Left Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Avulsion Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Pinky Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Finger Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Alternative to Pulley Taping
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hand: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • Rock Climbing Injury: First Pulley Strain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Cysts in Fingers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Rock Climbing Injury:Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Flappers
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Cysts
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Arthritis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Numbness
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Blown Knees
  • Rock Climbing Injury: MCL Injury
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Snapped ankle tendon
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Broken Talus Bone
  • America's Best Climbing Area: Red River Gorge
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Rock Climbing Injury: Bunions
  • Ice Climbing Injury: Toenail Pressure
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Broken Foot
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Rock Climbing Injury: Feet: Toe Fracture
  •  
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    Rock Climbing Injury: Wrist: Klienbock's Disease

    14-Jan-2013
    By

    I got an MRI because my doctor suspected a TFCC tear in my wrist. The imaging showed a perforation in the TFCC and avascular necrosis of the lunate bone (possibly Kienbock’s Disease). Three months later, the necrosis still showed on the MRI but I had no symptoms. When I asked my doc about getting back into climbing, he said “I hate climbers.” Backtracking, he then said, “I just hate climbing. We aren’t made for climbing. You should feel lucky you were able to climb for four years without injury. If you continue to climb, you will always have pain.” I started climbing a few weeks ago and get an achy feeling in the ulna side of my wrist, which lasts a day or two. Crack climbing the last two weekends at Index seems to p-off my wrist the most. —Christy Galitsky | Rock and Ice Forum

    “Uncommon things are uncommon.” That’s what they told us in school. Repeatedly. That is, headaches are rarely brain tumors. If you have Keinbocks, I will be surprised. Why? Because it’s uncommon. But if you do have it, your bone is dying and you’re not yet done with it. Pooh! Climbing is going to be less fun, if any at all. That said, the diagnosis is not confirmed so let’s just keep that in the wings.

    “You’re lucky you lasted that long”—I couldn’t agree more. I wish I had some ninja skills like yours. Four years injury-free would be a record for me and virtually every climber I know. Consider this injury a rite of passage, and not least of all a celebration that you have been trying hard!

    “If you continue to climb, you will always have pain”—definitely true, though it may or may not be in your wrist. Crack climbers have the pain tolerance of those who operate in a world of fear and jammed flesh. Scare tactics? Your doctor might as well try to bluff a professional poker player with a pair of UNO cards. “If you continue to climb, you will always have pain”—definitely true, though it may or may not be in your wrist. Crack climbers have the pain tolerance of those who operate in a world of fear and jammed flesh. Scare tactics? Your doctor might as well try to bluff a professional poker player with a pair of UNO cards.

    The pain you have on the pinky side of your wrist is most likely related to the TFCC. That the MRI only demonstrated a perforation a) does not dictate the amount of pain you should have, and b) is not necessarily true—there could be more damage than the MRI suggests.

    That it’s painful after crack climbing is predictable. I would try some gently overhanging face climbing and see how that goes. Crimping will probably be better than open handing.

    Regarding your lunate, it’s a wait-and-see game. If there is further necrosis of the bone you will have a real problem. I assume Captain Tactless has said you need to come back at some point in the near future. I would certainly follow up with him, but keep in mind that not all specialists understand or have compassion for sports people. If it worsens get a second opinion.


    KEINBOCK’S DISEASE
    In 1910 the observant Dr. Robert Kienbock, sans x-ray machine, told his charismatic assistant that he had discovered a new disease. She was enthralled, or at least pretended to be. Encouraged, Bob described the collapse and fragmentation of the lunate, one of the carpal bones in the wrist, due to what he believed was avascular necrosis (bone death resulting from disrupted blood supply). They married and had four children, all Oompa Loompas.

    It is thought that an injury to the wrist, which can be as minor as a sprain, pinches or severs the blood supply, but in a significant portion of cases no injury event can be identified. Progression of the disease is virtually always treated with surgery unless you are an Oompa Loompa, in which case it is microsurgery. 

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