The Masters


Jeff Ward - IFMGA/AMGA Guide

Jeff Ward is an IFMGA-licensed and AMGA-certified Alpine, Ski and Rock Guide. He grew up in the Northwest and is co-owner of North Cascades Mountain Guides (www.ncmountainguides.com) based in Mazama. Ward is a lead instructor for the American Mountain Guides Association and serves on their technical committee.



Martin Volken - IFMGA Guide

Martin Volken is the founder and owner of Pro Guiding Service and Pro Ski and Mountain Service in North Bend, WA. He is a certified IFMGA Swiss Mountain Guide and guides over 120 days per year in North America and Europe as a ski, rock and alpine guide. Volken has pioneered several steep ski descents, ski traverses, alpine and rock routes in the Washington Cascades. He has been a member of the AMGA examiner team since 2000 and has authored and co-authored three books on ski touring and ski mountaineering.

Got a question about climbing? Submit your question in the Ask the Master forum and either Jeff Ward or Martin Volken will supply the answer.

AMGA GUIDES' TIPS
Belaying from Above
Belaying from Above
 

Ask the Master: How Do You Anchor Yourself to a Multipitch Anchor?

22-Nov-2016
By Martin Volken (IFMGA Guide)

How do you anchor yourself to a multipitch anchor? I've seen folks toss a clove hitch onto the powerpoint carabiner and call it good, where other methods involve girth-hitched slings, purcells or commercial Personal Anchor Systems. What do you teach?

—Nick Belcaster, via Ask the Master forum

Martin Volken, owner of Pro Guiding Service and Pro Ski and Mountain Service in North Bend, WA, is a certified IFMGA Swiss Mountain Guide and guides in North America and Europe. He has been a member of the AMGA examiner team since 2000.

Hi there,

You could get several answers depending on who you ask, but here is mine.

I look to get myself safe very quickly without much effort, create a bit of redundancy, and I also want to make sure that I didn't bury my system so I can quickly and easily get free of it when it is time to move again.

I often anchor with a clove hitch tied in my climbing rope on a locking carabiner, which gets clipped to the first anchor piece I place. The clove hitch is a great knot at the anchor, because it is quickly built and adjustable with the carabiner closed and locked. Once the entire anchor is built I clip my PAS into a point above the master point, although sometimes I do it the other way around.

Keep it safe, simple and clean.

—Martin Volken

 

 

Got a question about climbing? Submit your question in the Ask the Master forum and Martin Volken will supply the answer. We will select our favorite question to be published in the next issue of Rock and Ice! Whoever's question is selected will receive a FREE Outdoor Research Deviator Hoody ($185 value).

 

This article originally appeared in Rock and Ice issue 239.

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