Body

  • Broken Hand
  • NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Open-Heart Surgery
  • Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Body: Injury Truths
  • Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Body: Chronic Injury
  • Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Options for Disc Herniation
  • Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Shoulder Replacement
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Exploding Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Shoulder: Separation
  • Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Golfer's Elbow
  • Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Synovial Chips
  • Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Elbow Pain and Cortisone Use
  • Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • TFCC Tear
  • Wrist Pain From Cleaning Routes
  • Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Broken Hand
  • Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Pinky Numbness
  • Avulsion Fracture
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Finger Numbness
  • Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • First Pulley Strain
  • Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Cysts in Fingers
  • Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Major Finger Pain
  • Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Fingers: Flappers
  • Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Fingers: Cysts
  • Fingers: Arthritis
  • Fingers: Numbness
  • Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • MCL Injury
  • Blown Knees
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Snapped ankle tendon
  • Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Broken Talus Bone
  • Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Bunions
  • Dr. J Attacks Fungal Toenails
  • Feet: Broken Foot
  • Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Feet: Toe Fracture
  • Video Spotlight
    FREE - Big Wall Climbing in Yosemite with Jorg Verhoeven and Katha Saurwein
    FREE - Big Wall Climbing in Yosemite with Jorg Verhoeven and Katha Saurwein
    Whipper of the Month
    Weekend Whipper: Alastair McDowell's Los Indignados (M7) Screamer
    Weekend Whipper: Alastair McDowell's Los Indignados (M7) Screamer
     



    Bursting Biceps

    14-May-2015
    By

      I was on a route yesterday where I had a four-finger undercling with my right hand. As I put all my weight onto it to reach the next hold, I heard a snapping sound and felt something similar to an electric shock in my right forearm and bicep. There was no immediate pain, but today my arm is sore when I bend the elbow to 45 degrees, make a fist and/or extend the wrist and pronate. The pain travels along the inside and top of my forearm and my bicep feels soft even when contracted.


    - DC72 / rockandice.com Forum

     

    Oh dear, an actual injury. That you have damaged the bicep insertion is fairly apparent, although there are a couple of other possibilities.

    The insertion of the bicep is quite complex at the elbow. One part (the strongest) attaches to the radius; the other is a fascial attachment called the bicipital aponeurosis. You can tear either of these points, but are more likely to rupture the radial insertion.

    When you flip someone the bird, your brachialis bends your elbow, and your bicep turns your forearm so that your middle finger sticks suitably skyward. The Hook Test will give you a solid indication as to whether the tendon is fully ruptured. On the good arm and with the elbow flexed to 90 degrees, find the tendon that sits below the muscle and runs into the front of the elbow (it is about the width of a pen). Hook your finger around it and get a good sense of what it feels like. Now try it on the injured side. If the radial side is ruptured but the aponeurosis is intact, the tendon will feel thinner and be positioned slightly closer to the inside of the elbow (if you are looking straight down your arm), and the bicep will be only mildly bunched compared to the good side. If both are ruptured, the tendon will be absent and the bicep will have recoiled up the arm toward the shoulder and look like someone stuffed a tennis ball in there.

    In your case, since the bicep is still able to shorten in a roughly symmetrical manner, the injury is almost certainly not a full rupture of both points. However, the fact that the bicep won’t firm up when contracted is a clear indication that all is not well.


    If you have a rupture of the radial insertion, you will only have a mild loss of strength when flexing your bicep since elbow flexion, contrary to popular belief, is not the bicep’s role. The brachialis muscle that sits beneath the bicep is the prime mover of elbow flexion, inadvertently lifting the bicep to aesthetic glory.

    The role of the bicep is primarily to supinate the forearm, such as when you flip someone the bird. Your brachialis bends your elbow, and your bicep turns your forearm so that your middle finger sticks suitably skyward.

    Get a specialist’s opinion, and fast. Delay can reduce the chances of a successful reattachment by way of tendon retraction and scarring.

     

    This article was published in Rock and Ice 208 (March 2013)

    Reader's Commentary:

    Don't want to use Facebook, but still want to comment? We have you covered:

    Add Your Comments to this article:

    Hello