Body

  • Broken Hand
  • NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Open-Heart Surgery
  • Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Body: Injury Truths
  • Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Body: Chronic Injury
  • Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Options for Disc Herniation
  • Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Shoulder Replacement
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Exploding Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Shoulder: Separation
  • Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Golfer's Elbow
  • Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Synovial Chips
  • Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Elbow Pain and Cortisone Use
  • Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • TFCC Tear
  • Wrist Pain From Cleaning Routes
  • Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Broken Hand
  • Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Pinky Numbness
  • Avulsion Fracture
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Finger Numbness
  • Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • First Pulley Strain
  • Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Cysts in Fingers
  • Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Major Finger Pain
  • Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Fingers: Flappers
  • Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Fingers: Cysts
  • Fingers: Arthritis
  • Fingers: Numbness
  • Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • MCL Injury
  • Blown Knees
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Snapped ankle tendon
  • Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Broken Talus Bone
  • Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Bunions
  • Dr. J Attacks Fungal Toenails
  • Feet: Broken Foot
  • Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Feet: Toe Fracture
  • Video Spotlight
    The Full Send Footage of Ethan Pringle's Jumbo Love (5.15b) Ascent
    The Full Send Footage of Ethan Pringle's Jumbo Love (5.15b) Ascent
    Whipper of the Month
    Weekend Whipper: Alastair McDowell's Los Indignados (M7) Screamer
    Weekend Whipper: Alastair McDowell's Los Indignados (M7) Screamer
     



    Exploding Shoulder

    19-May-2015
    By Dr. Julian Saunders

    I dislocated my shoulder over the summer and was forced to take a hiatus from climbing. After three months of physical therapy, my shoulder still hurts in certain positions on the wall. The pain is quickly followed by my arm giving out, and discomfort for a couple of days after. Will my shoulder ever go back to normal? Are there specific exercises I should do to build strength and are there movements I shouldn’t do?

    —LOOSEHOLD, Rock and Ice Forum

     

     Shoulder dislocations can wreak havoc with your climbing unless you rehab thoroughly. Illustration by Steve Graepel.For a climber, having a dislocated shoulder is akin to being a porn star with a fractured penis.

    You need some damn fine professionals watching your rehab every step of the way, if for no other reason than to avoid the speed traps. If you have not had an MRI—and it doesn’t sound like you have—sack your current treatment team en masse.

    A shoulder dislocation is like a bomb going off in a mall—until you have a look inside, you won’t have a damage report to base your next move on. If you have significant cartilage damage that has not stabilized, any rehab now is like repairing the Titanic with papier mâché.

    I appreciate that the United States medical system doesn’t routinely allow an early MRI for such an injury, but an athlete who is going to re-enter the sporting arena at the earliest possible time (and probably too early if not managed closely) needs an accurate assessment. A shoulder that dislocates for a second time due to damage inflicted to the joint in the first injury is significantlymore likely to dislocate multiple times thereafter, at which point you might as well take up croquet and dating older women.

    As long as your rehab is thorough, and by that I mean involves massive amounts of stability and strength-based exercises, you should be able to climb again, and even improve on your previous best. The discretionary qualifier here is that I don’t know how much internal derangement there is. A nasty dislocation is virtually impossible to rehabilitate fully without surgery, let alone in three months. I have seen patients with massive amounts of damage who didn’t even realize they’d temporarily dislocated their shoulders. I’ve also seen many a person whose dislocation was forever forgotten two moments and a glass of wine after it was relocated.

    If you have had an MRI and are cleared of major structural injury then I suspect you need more time and more (or better) rehab until your shoulder is ready for the stresses of climbing. If you have a reasonable range of motion, you should be OK to try any particular movement as long as the loading is graduated. My advice: Get a shoulder rehab specialist.

     

    This article was published in Rock and Ice No. 217 (April 2014).

    Reader's Commentary:

    Don't want to use Facebook, but still want to comment? We have you covered:

    Add Your Comments to this article:

    Hello