Body

  • Broken Hand
  • NSAIDS: To Use or Not to Use
  • Hydrocele, Spermatocele and Strained Groin
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Open-Heart Surgery
  • Osteopenia and Increasing Bone Density
  • Body: Pain Meds vs Sex
  • Appendectomy and Climbing Training
  • Body: Injury Truths
  • Body: BPA and Waterbottles
  • Body: Bouldering for Bone Density
  • Body: Chronic Injury
  • Body: Bouldering for the Bones
  • Body: Antibiotics and Tendon Damage
  • Back

  • Lumbar Bone Spurs
  • Options for Disc Herniation
  • Back: Spinal Fracture
  • Back: Preventing Hunchback
  • Back: Herniated Disc
  • Abdomen

  • Abdomen: Muscle Tear/Hernia
  • Arm

    No items found.

    Shoulder

  • Thoracic Musculature Tightness
  • Chronic Posterior Shoulder Pain
  • Supraspinatus and Labral Tears
  • Chronic Shoulder Pain
  • Shoulder Replacement
  • Shoulder Pain
  • Exploding Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Thoracic Outlet Syndrome
  • Shoulder: SLAP Lesion and Cortisone
  • Shoulder: Frozen Shoulder
  • Shoulder: Torn Labrum, SLAP Lesion
  • Shoulder: Separation
  • Shoulder: Pain and Virus
  • Biceps

  • Bursting Biceps
  • Elbow

  • Golfer's Elbow
  • Elbow: Brachioradialis Pain
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Medial Epicondylosis Tendonitis
  • Dodgy Elbows Revisited
  • Synovial Chips
  • Quack Elbow Treatments to Avoid
  • Elbow Pain and Cortisone Use
  • Do Compression Sleeves Work?
  • Elbow: Tennis Elbow
  • Elbow: Medial Tendonosis
  • Elbow Pain and Dodgy Elbows
  • Elbow: Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondylosis and Taping
  • Elbow: Tingling and Numbness
  • Elbows: Minimizing Fingerboard Injuries
  • Elbow: Medial Epicondyle Tendonosis
  • Elbow: Stress Fracture
  • Elbow: Pain and Hangboarding
  • Wrist

  • TFCC Tear
  • Wrist Pain From Cleaning Routes
  • Wrist: Klienbock's Disease
  • Wrist: Ruptured Tendon
  • Snap, Crackle, Wrist
  • Wrist: Fractured Scaphoid
  • Wrist: Instability
  • Hand

  • Broken Hand
  • Hand: Hook of the Hamate Fracture
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Hands: Dupuytren's Disease (lump in palm)
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers

  • Swollen Right Index Finger
  • Pinky Numbness
  • Avulsion Fracture
  • Hand: Arthritis
  • Finger Numbness
  • Fourth Metacarpal Break
  • First Pulley Strain
  • Freezing Fingers Today, Benefit Tomorrow?
  • Cysts in Fingers
  • Ruptured Finger Pulley
  • Major Finger Pain
  • Fingers: What To Do with a Ruptured Flexor Digitorum Superficialis
  • Fingers: Everything You Need to Know About Finger Stress
  • Fingers: Hyper-extended
  • Fingers: Cysts and Pain
  • Fingers: Cracked Fingertips
  • Fingers: De Quervain's Tenosynovitis
  • Fingers: NSAID Treatment
  • Fingers: Torn A2 Pulley
  • Fingers: Trigger Thumb Syndrome
  • Fingers: Stiffness, Soreness
  • Fingers: Grip Position and Injury
  • Fingers: Cortisone for Tendon Injuries
  • Fingers: Pinky Finger Pain
  • Fingers: Electrostimulation
  • Hands: Numbness and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  • Fingers: Taping Truths
  • Fingers: Flappers
  • Fingers: Trigger-Finger Syndrome
  • Fingers: Torn A3 and A4 Pulleys
  • Fingers: Cysts
  • Fingers: Arthritis
  • Fingers: Numbness
  • Fingers: Blown Tendons
  • Leg

  • Leg: Achilles Tendonitis
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Leg: Pulled Hamstring
  • Leg: Fracture
  • Knee

  • Outside Knee Pain: Tibiofibular Joint
  • MCL Injury
  • Blown Knees
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Meniscal Tear on a Drop Knee
  • Knee: Rockfall Causes Lump
  • Knee: Chondral Injury of the Lateral Tibial Plateau
  • Leg and Knee: Broken Femur and Shattered Kneecap
  • Knee: Ruptured ACL
  • Knee: Ruptured Ligament and Meniscus
  • Knee: Synovial Cartilage Damage
  • Ankle

  • Osteochondral Talus Fracture
  • Knee Tendonitis after Ankle Fusion
  • Snapped ankle tendon
  • Possible Death of the Talus Bone
  • Broken Talus Bone
  • Ankle: Loud Pop Ankle Roll
  • Feet

  • Bunions
  • Dr. J Attacks Fungal Toenails
  • Feet: Broken Foot
  • Feet: Gout and Pseudogout
  • Feet: Toe Fracture
  • Video Spotlight
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    Shoulder Replacement

    28-May-2015
    By

    Shoulder-replacement surgeries are becoming more common, and there’s nothing to say they won’t work for ailing climbers. Illustration by Steve Graepel.I had a labrum repair about 10 years ago . Another scope confirms that I now have very little cartilage left in my shoulder and when I get tired of the pain, shoulder replacement is my only option. Any thoughts?

    — OLD BUT NOT IN WAY, Rock and Ice Forum

    There are about 50,000 shoulder-replacement surgeries in the United States each year. Although less common than knee and hip replacements, shoulder-replacement surgery is effective in many instances.

    A replacement prosthetic has a lifespan, so you want to push it back as long as you can while still maintaining a happy life. Shoulder replacement surgery is not beyond revision in most cases, but it’s not ideal.

    I don’t know any climber who has had shoulder replacement surgery. What little data there is regarding return to sport following surgery does suggest good success rates to previous levels and better. Unfortunately, the only sizable study looked at golf, swimming and tennis—none of which even vaguely load the shoulder like climbing.

    There is nothing to say you can return to climbing. But, there is nothing to say you can’t, either. Don’t expect to see any research involving rock climbing unless it’s your own case study. That said, a rock climber would be a great case study since the state of your rotator cuff has a definite influence on the outcome of shoulder-replacement surgery, and yours should still be strong.

    There would be limitations—you’d probably have to restrict yourself to slabs (i.e. less than 20 degrees overhanging) and avoid overload in extended positions. I have seen some advisory web pages saying no loading beyond 20 pounds with your arm above your head, but I can find no references for that figure and as such it is largely worthless but for the conservative masses who love to follow instructions. That said, there are situations, e.g. osteoporosis, where even 10 pounds might lead to prosthetic failure. Ultimately it is a case-by-case basis, not least of all contingent on what you are trying to achieve with your climbing. I am not saying it’s time to kick back into recliner mode, just that it is prudent to understand the risks.

    My theory would be if one person can climb post-op, the realm of possibility is actually the reality. What better motivation to work on your footwork than the prospect of breaking your shoulder replacement.

    Bain De Sang (5.14d) at 55 with a total shoulder replacement? It has a nice ring to it. Manolo climbed this slab at age 48, so there is a clear opportunity for some geriatric one-upmanship.

     

    This article was published in Rock and Ice 221 (October 2014).

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