Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Cliff Notes

Majka Burhardt’s Favorite 5.10: Diedre [5.10a] // Cathedral Ledge

Majka Burhardt's all-time favorite 5.10 is "Diedre, a four-pitch line up the middle-right of the soaring east face of Cathedral Ledge, used to be 5.9. Sometimes it feels like 5.11."

Lock Icon

Become a member to unlock this story and receive other great perks.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

All Access
$1.33 / week *

  • A $500 value with 25+ benefits including:
  • Access to all member-only content on all 17 publications in the Outside network like Rock and Ice, Climbing, Outside, Backpacker, Trail Runner and more
  • Annual subscription to Climbing magazine.
  • Gaia GPS premium with thousands of maps and global trail recommendations.
  • Try out best-in-class gear and apparel for free before you buy
  • Coming Soon: Premium access to Outside TV and 1,000+ hours of exclusive shows
  • Annual subscription to Outside magazine
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

My favorite 5.10 is one I can only climb, well, 50 percent of the time. Two years ago I moved from Colorado to New Hampshire, where you can’t just climb 5.10 in the dry perfection of fall, you have to be able to climb it in the slimy humidity of summer, or when it’s covered with a veneer of ice in the winter. Diedre, a four-pitch line up the middle-right of the soaring east face of Cathedral Ledge, used to be 5.9. Sometimes it feels like 5.11.

I first climbed Diedre in the winter of 2009 with Zoe Hart, visiting from Europe. We wanted a mixed New England classic, and Diedre was iced up and ready, starting with an awkward chimney and giving way to a vertical pillar within a hanging corner. The second pitch was a delicate ice curtain, the third was a gently overhanging, .75-inch steep corner crack, and the topout was a roof move onto a hanging curtain. I told Zoe I couldn’t wait to come back and climb it in the summer, when it was “easy.”

Then summer came. Several summers have in fact come and gone. Diedre has yet to be easy. The first time I racked up for it as a rock climb was with the local Sarah Garlick. I stepped up, grabbed onto holds, and proceeded to drop my backside down low—really low—as if it were attached to two 30-pound sandbags.

It took me another 30 feet to realize what was wrong. Above the first 5.5 section of chimney climbing, a four-foot ice pillar was missing. Because it was July.

“Farrrrrr out,” I said.

“What?” Sarah called up.

I tried to explain. “It’s rock … but I’m climbing ice … or trying to … ”.

“What?”

In that moment, as I meshed two kinds of knowledge, Diedre became my favorite 5.10, and not just because it has one of the best hand cracks at Cathedral. I’ve gone back over a dozen times. Practically every kind of climbing is packed into the route’s pitches. Start with a chimney, move into a short and powerful corner choked with finger jams, and go right. The Diedre traverse is what makes or breaks you. I’ve done it comforta