Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Accident Prevention

Respected Climber Falls 50 Feet and Dies at Cathedral Ledge

Brian Delaney, respected climber of Scarborough, Maine, died Saturday afternoon after an estimated 50-foot fall from the top of a climb on the upper left wall of Cathedral Ledge in New Hampshire, according to the Conway Daily Sun.

Lock Icon

Unlock this article and unwrap savings this holiday season.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

Now 30% Off.
$4.99/month $3.49/month*

Get the one subscription to fuel all your adventures.


  • Map your next adventure with our premium GPS apps: Gaia GPS Premium and Trailforks Pro.
  • Read unlimited digital content from 15+ brands, including Outside Magazine, Triathlete, Ski, Trail Runner, and VeloNews.
  • Watch 600+ hours of endurance challenges, cycling and skiing action, and travel documentaries.
  • Learn from the pros with expert-led online courses.
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. Print subscriptions available to U.S. residents only. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

Brian Delaney, respected climber of Scarborough, Maine, died Saturday afternoon after an estimated 50-foot fall from the top of a climb on the upper left wall of Cathedral Ledge in New Hampshire, according to the Conway Daily Sun.

Delaney, now in his mid-50s with over 35 years of climbing experience, was known for many early first ascents on and near Cathedral Ledge as well as in Yosemite, Indian Creek and at the Shagg Crag in his home state of Maine.

According to rescuer reports, Delaney had been rope-soloing close to a route called Double Vee (5.9+). Delaney fell near the top of the route and something within his system failed.

After a report of a serious injury at the Barber Wall, rescuers got to him while he was still alive and talking, but not making sense, according to the Conway Daily Sun. Delaney had broken a femur, two arms and had unknown internal injuries.

The rescue team, recognizing the seriousness of the situation, started moving him quickly, but at a point during the move, Delaney stopped breathing.

The team performed CPR, but it didn’t work. The rescue had turned into a recovery.

“I’ve met few people as good-hearted, kind and genuinely humble as Brian,” said Travis Herbert, one of Delaney’s climbing partners, to the Conway Daily Sun. “He approached life with zest and vibrance. More than the climbing, I remember Brian glowingly talking about his daughter, Hana, sharing stories of her exploits on the swim team, theater and beyond. He loved his family dearly and traveled the world with them.”

Delaney left behind a wife and daughter.