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Injuries and Medical Advice

Osteochondral Talus Fracture

Patient seeks to maintain fitness after microfracture treatment on fractured talus.

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This article appeared in Rock and Ice issue 204 (September 2012).


I’ve just had microfracture treatment on an osteochondral fracture of the talus. Four weeks non-weight-bearing; possibly six. I am hoping to use a turbo trainer to keep fitness up but am concerned about how it will affect the injured ankle. If the ankle just sits on the pedal and doesn’t do anything, it shouldn’t take much weight. Should I worry? Also, where’s the best spot to position the foot on the pedal?

 —Hutton, via rockandice.com

You are experimenting with this like a 10-year-old boy plays with marshmallows and gunpowder. Take all the rest that is recommended by your physicians. Only they know the extent of your injury and what has been done to repair it.

Life is short, but it’s not that short. If you dislodge the chondral fracture, or even just impair the healing process, you are doing yourself a major
disservice for very little gain.

This is a great time to talk with your mom. Tell her about your frustration. Ask for her advice.


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