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Alex Megos Sends Lucid Dreaming (V15)

German wunderkind, Alex Megos, has polished off the third ascent of Lucid Dreaming (V15) in the Buttermilks of Bishop, California.

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contributor Ken Etzel was on the scene to capture Megos’ send with his camera.

Megos had traveled to Bishop specifically to pit himself against the notoriously low-percentage moves of Lucid Dreaming. Battling with the problem’s sharp, granite holds, the 21-year-old German struggled with skin loss while projecting the line. However, after a few rest days, Megos pulled through the moves and topped out Lucid Dreaming this morning, according to Etzel. Etzel also notes that a little moisture helped create the perfect conditions.

“We finally got some moisture here in the Eastern Sierra and I think that really made the difference for the send,” says Etzel. “I’ve always called it ‘sticky wet’ when the holds are so slick, it takes a little moisture to create friction.”

However, the moisture made the topout a little spicy.

“The upper slab was exciting since it was wet, they threw him a chalk bag and brush to dry off the feet and away he went,” says Etzel. “This kids the real deal, not only an amazing athlete he’s a great person to spend time with.”

Established in 2010 by Paul Robinson, the problem was an often tried sit-start to Rastaman Vibration (V12) and initially speculated to be one the few V16’s in the world. However, Robinson eventually retracted his initial claim, stating: “When I first did this climb it felt so much harder than anything I had done in the past (Terremer [V15] Jade [V14], etc). Now that I have climbed so many more difficult boulders I have a real understanding for 8b+ [V14] and 8c [V15].”

Daniel Woods nabbed the second ascent of the problem last January and confirmed the V15 grade.