Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

Five Climbers Killed in Mont Blanc Massif

Five bodies have been recovered on Aiguille d'Argentière, a 12,799-foot peak in France's Mont Blanc massif. A rescue operation is underway to extract a visible but unconscious sixth climber from a crevasse.

Lock Icon

Become a member to unlock this story and receive other great perks.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

All Access
25% off Best Of The Year Sale
$1.43 / week*

  • A $500 value with 25+ benefits including:
  • Access to all member-only content on all 17 publications in the Outside network like Rock and Ice, Climbing, Outside, Backpacker, Trail Runner and more
  • Annual subscription to Climbing magazine.
  • Annual gear guides for climbing, camping, skiing, cycling, and more
  • Gaia GPS Premium with hundreds of maps and global trail recommendations, a $39.99 value
  • Today’s Plan training platform with customized training plans
  • Premium access to Outside TV and 1,000+ hours of exclusive shows
  • Annual subscription to Outside magazine
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. Print subscriptions available to U.S. residents only. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

The north face of the Aiguille d'Argentiere.Five bodies have been recovered on Aiguille d’Argentière, a 12,799-foot peak in France’s Mont Blanc massif. A rescue operation is underway to extract a visible but unconscious sixth climber from a crevasse. The five bodies were found Wednesday morning, according to a report from the New York Times. The climbers were missing overnight, and were caught in a storm that brought high winds and snow to the peak. According to officials, the climbers died in a fall, reports the Times.

The Guardian reports that the five climbers consisted of four men and one woman aged between 27 and 45. They were being guided on the popular peak as part of a two week mountaineering course. The condition of the sixth climber is still unknown at this time.

The Aigulle d’Argentière lies on the border of France and Switzerland and is a highly traveled peak during the summer months. A team of British mountaineers including Edward Whymper and A. Reilly (along with guides Michel Croz, M. Payot, H. Charlet) claimed the mountain’s first ascent in 1864.