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Jon Cardwell Sends Wheel of Chaos (V14) In A Day

Jon Cardwell sent Wheel of Chaos (V15) of Upper Chaos Canyon in RMNP on September 14, linking the 23 moves together in just two tries.

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Jon Cardwell sent Wheel of Chaos (V14) of Upper Chaos Canyon in RMNP on September 14, linking the 23 moves together in just two tries after warming up on the problem.

“My friend Ty [Landman] and I worked through the moves while warming up for about an hour,” Cardwell wrote to Rock and Ice, “and then I decided, why not try it from the start? After one fumbled attempt, I made it through the bottom crux and took it to the top.”

Cardwell on the send of <em>Wheel of Chaos</em> (V14). Photo Courtesy of Jon Cardwell” />Although Cardwell was surprised he sent so quickly, he said the problem fit his style, and the hard sport routes he’d been sending in France and Rifle, Colorado, helped him get strong enough for <em>Wheel of Chaos. </em></p>
<p>He had been dedicating his time to sport climbing since April, sending <em>Mission Impossible </em>(5.14c/d), and making the second ascent of <em>Morning Glory </em>(5.14c/d), both in Colorado’s Clear Creek Canyon. Cardwell said these were in preparation for his ultimate goal of climbing <em>Realization </em>(5.15a) in France. He left Ceuse without the send, but decided to keep working on sport climbing after returning to the US. </p>
<p>Cardwell traveled to Rifle, where he climbed two 5.14as, a 5.14b and bagged the first ascent of a 5.14b he dubbed <em>Nastalgie. </em></p>
<p><span>Cardwell worked </span><em>Planet Garbage</em><span>, an estimated 5.14c, which Matty Hong had established on a previous trip with Cardwell. Cardwell found that a critical hold had broken off, and after finding a new sequence and linking together a new V9 move to the original crux, he carried it through the the chains.</span></p>
<p>“I believe it’s the hardest route I’ve done in Rifle,” Cardwell wrote. “Whether or not it’s 5.14d, I’m not sure, but it certainly got me in good shape for <em>Wheel of Chaos</em>!”</p>
<p>Two days after bouldering in Upper Chaos Canyon, he traveled to Stuttgart, Germany, where he will participate in the Adidas Rockstars Competition, an invitational bouldering event, on September 19.  </p>
<p>“Off to Germany for another chance at Adidas Rockstars!” Cardwell posted on his Instagram. “Had a good time bouldering in the alpine with Ty Landman and excited for more when I return.” </p>


        

        

        
        
                          
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