Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

Plane Crash Kills Climber Andy Tyson

Andy Tyson, 46, of Victor, Idaho was a prominent climber, guide and author. He, along with three other men, were killed in a plane crash on Friday.

Lock Icon

Unlock this article and unwrap savings this holiday season.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

Now 30% Off.
$4.99/month $3.49/month*

Get the one subscription to fuel all your adventures.


  • Map your next adventure with our premium GPS apps: Gaia GPS Premium and Trailforks Pro.
  • Read unlimited digital content from 15+ brands, including Outside Magazine, Triathlete, Ski, Trail Runner, and VeloNews.
  • Watch 600+ hours of endurance challenges, cycling and skiing action, and travel documentaries.
  • Learn from the pros with expert-led online courses.
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. Print subscriptions available to U.S. residents only. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

Andy Tyson (Facebook Photo).A plane crash killed four men outside of Challis, Idaho on Friday.

Andy Tyson, 46, A.J. Linnell, 39, Russell Cheney, 34, and pilot John H. Short, 70, all died in the accident. The four were leaving Diamond-D Ranch, owned by Short, when Short’s single-engine Cessna crashed not long after takeoff.

Rescue Incident Commander Levi Maydole said in an interview with Jackson Holes News & Guide: “In those mountain canyons, air currents can change dramatically and can throw those little aluminum planes around.”

Tyson, from Victor, Idaho was a prominent climber, guide and author. His works include the how-to books Climbing Self Rescue and Glacier Mountaineering. Tyson was founder of the renewable energies company, Creative Energies, which employed Linnell and Cheney. They were assessing Diamond-D for solar and hydroelectric possibilities at the time of the crash.

Tyson instructed for NOLS from 1993 to 2003, teaching a variety of courses from climbing and mountaineering to instructor courses, in the U.S. and Patagonia. Tyson also led for Alpine Ascents, Exum Mountain Guides, and Antarctic Logistics and Expeditions.

He is survived by his wife, Molly Loomis, who is also a climber, guide and writer. She has been a feature contributor for Rock and Ice in the past.

Tyson and Loomis established several first ascents in the Genyen Massif of China, and more recently, led a team to the summit of Gamlang Razi in Myanmar, the first ascent of one of Southeast Asia’s highest peaks. The expedition is featured in the film, Myanmar Bridges to Change.

A community gathering and candlelight vigil was held Sunday night in remembrance of Tyson, Linnell, Cheney and Short. Each has a Facebook page for friends, family and community to honor their lives by sharing memories and photos.