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Trango Concealed Carry Chalk Bag

As any climber knows, chalk-bag drawstring closures don’t do diddly to keep chalk from escaping, but the Concealed Carry’s double hood keeps it on lock.

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As any climber knows, chalk-bag drawstring closures don’t do diddly to keep chalk from escaping. Nothing is safe. My climbing pack, crash pads and car are all victims of chalk-dust torture. So I had trouble containing my excitement when I heard Trango put the “When in doubt, double-hood it” mantra into practice with a chalk bag.

For an extra layer of protection, the Concealed Carry has an attached elastic hood that caps its standard drawstring closure. The hood stores in a pocket on the waist-belt side of the chalk bag when you’re climbing. In theory, with the hood on, chalk can’t leak.

To put the Concealed Carry to the test, I filled it with chalk and took it for a long, hard ride—Carbondale, Colorado, to Rocklands, South Africa.
That’s 204 miles through the Rocky Mountains by car, 10,679 turbulent miles over two flights (with careless baggage handlers), and another—white-knuckled, left-lane, steering-wheel-on-the-wrong- side—155 miles of driving into the Cederberg Mountains to the best sandstone boulders in the world.

When I opened my climbing pack 50 hours later, there wasn’t a hint of white powder anywhere. The Concealed Carry’s double hood kept it on lock.

This review originally appeared in Rock and Ice issue 238 (November 2016).