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Climbing Packs

Gregory Torre 33

I didn’t want to like this pack. Anything that’s more complicated to load than a laundry basket seems too complex to my pea-sized brain.

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Gregory Torre 33

www.gregorypacks.com |$140 | 4 Stars

I didn’t want to like this pack. Anything that’s more complicated to load than a laundry basket seems too complex to my pea-sized brain. The Torre 33, though very sleek, had straps and zippers and a rolltop. Like many packs on the market, it seemed overly intricate at first blush.

After a solid month of climbing with the Torre 33, however, I’m singing a different tune. For being a relatively small daypack, the Torre 33 does a surprisingly good job of holding a full rack, 80-meter rope, two pairs of shoes, a harness, chalk bag, chalk pot, extra clothing and water. (Full disclosure: for all that to fit I had to figure out a very specific packing order; I was also using the compact Arc’teryx Pali rope bag and 220s harness).

Accessing gear is really easy. Undo the rolltop, and unzip the full-length zipper running down the right side of the pack. The Torre unfolds like a taco and all of the gear inside is easy to pick at. The straps on the outside of the pack can be used to cinch down a rope, a downie or hoody, and a rain jacket. Mesh pockets on the sides fit water bottles. I stored car keys and a cell phone in the handy zipper pouch on the waist belt (I never had to dig through my pack to find my car keys, or even take the pack off!).

My one big gripe is with the top stash pocket—I wish it were much bigger, and that I could more easily get in there when the pack is full. I also wish there were a way to store/hide the rope-compression straps when not in use—having to undo them every time you want to unroll the pack is annoying, and just letting them dangle unclipped seems messy.

  • Rolltop-style pack, with zipper that opens pack and can be accessed from either end.
  • 33 liters.
  • Hydration-pouch compatible, side water-bottle mesh pockets.
  • Tuck-away ice-axe straps
  • Fits everything you need for a day of cragging in a slim design.