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Climbing Shoes

Five Ten Anasazi Slipper

Stop press! Five Ten makes slipper from Anasazi last. Sounds a bit dull, but we were amazed by what the combination does for this shoe.

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Five Ten Anasazi Slipper, $100

  • Steep rock: 4 Star
  • Face climbing: 3 Star
  • Long routes: 1 Star
  • Upper: Synthetic (lined)
  • Rubber: 4.2mm Stealth C4

Stop press! Five Ten makes slipper from Anasazi last. Sounds a bit dull, but we were amazed by what the combination does for this shoe. As one tester put it, “This is the most precise slipper I’ve used!” The Anasazi Slipper excels on steep rock and slides into thin cracks, while a thin midsole makes it surprisingly powerful on face climbs, too. Perhaps the best thing is that it doesn’t have to be sized excruciatingly tight to perform well — i.e. it doesn’t rolf your feet. My only gripe is that the flat-backed heel cup doesn’t stay put. Just thinking about heel hooking is enough to send this slipper flying into the bushes. That said, I’m a sucker for comfort. On short technical terrain, from vertical limestone to 45-degree-overhanging plywood, this was the shoe I most often wanted to use.

+ Comfort and performance.

– Heel hooking — don’t even get me started!