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Rock Climbing Clothing

Foehn Brise Pants

Sweet, stretchy pants for the blocs or the bolts

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MSRP: $129.95

BEST FOR: Bouldering or sport climbing

The Brise pants, the signature piece of climbing clothing company Foehn, fall in a middle area between many of the techier, lightweight synthetic climbing pants on the market today, and the newer phenomenon of climbing jeans. To be sure, the Brise are synthetic—they are 96% nylon, 4% spandex—but they have a heavier feel to them closer to denim. Still, unlike your faded Levis, the Brise pants stretch when—and where—you need them to, thanks to that pinch of spandex in the fabric recipe.     

We’ve taken these pants out sport climbing and trad climbing and found they accommodated all the different types of movement we threw at them—high steps, wide split-like stances, and more. They fit fairly snugly—perhaps a tad more than we’d prefer—but the combination of the stretch fabric with a gusseted crotch, gusseted ankle zippers and even stretchier waistbands and cuffs, helps maintain your freedom of mobility. 

The Brise pants are breathable, though that slightly heavier weight also means they keep you decently warm. They are not the right choice for a sunny day of summer sport climbing, but would be perfect for a breezy day of alpine bouldering or anytime when you’re chasing those chillier sending temps.  

A small feature, but one sure to be appreciated by climbers in any discipline, is the zippered pocket above the right knee. It is positioned so that it is accessible and still functional even when you’ve got your harness on. The front pockets are deep enough for any tiny things like chapstick, but have no zipper, so best not to keep your phone in there if high off the deck. Ditto with the back pockets. 

The one caveat we would give about these pants is that, though they seem fairly tough upon first inspection, they are not the pants to try to send your offwidth proj in or go cheese-grating down that granite slab. After taking them for a few spins around the block on single pitch climbs, we wore them on a long multi-pitch requiring the full bag of wide and chimneying tricks, only to tear a solid-sized hole in that sweet thigh pocket by the end of the day. So while good for sport and bouldering, maybe keep them out of the cracks.


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Rock and Ice vigorously tests all gear it reviews for either 50 days or 50 pitches. This is a time-consuming process and limits the amount of new equipment we can present to our readers. Every year hundreds of new products hit store shelves, and most of these aren’t reviewed due to our stringent selection and review process. To better keep you more up to date on what is new, we present First Look. Gear in First Look has not always been field tested, but is gear we think you’d like to know about as soon as it is available. Some of the gear will be reviewed using our 50 days/50 pitches criteria, in future print and online editions of Rock and Ice. We have opted to use affiliate links in our gear reviews. Every time you buy something after clicking on links in our gear articles you’re helping support our magazine.