Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Master Class

Ask the Master: Waterfall Ice – To Adze, or Not to Adze

"Is having an adze on your technical ice tool the mountaineering equivalent of showing up to a bouldering gym with your harness on (a.k.a. the sign of a novice)?"

Lock Icon

Unlock this article and more benefits with 25% off.

Already have an Outside Account? Sign in

Outside+ Logo

25% Off Outside+.
$4.99/month $3.75/month*

Get the one subscription to fuel all your adventures.


  • Map your next adventure with our premium GPS apps: Gaia GPS Premium and Trailforks Pro.
  • Read unlimited digital content from 15+ brands, including Outside Magazine, Triathlete, Ski, Trail Runner, and VeloNews.
  • Watch 600+ hours of endurance challenges, cycling and skiing action, and travel documentaries.
  • Learn from the pros with expert-led online courses.
Join Outside+

*Outside memberships are billed annually. Print subscriptions available to U.S. residents only. You may cancel your membership at anytime, but no refunds will be issued for payments already made. Upon cancellation, you will have access to your membership through the end of your paid year. More Details

I might be stirring the pot a bit with this question, but I’ve noticed a disturbing trend. It seems like every time I witness a novice ice leader stumbling their way up a WI 3/4 that they have no business leading, the leader-in-question always has an adze on one of their high-end, aggressive ice tools. I’ve seen this whether I’m at an ice fest or just down at the local crag. A quick YouTube search of “ice climbing falls” also confirms this theory [Weekend Whipper: Ice Fall Wrecking Ball].

Is having an adze on your technical ice tool the mountaineering equivalent of showing up to a bouldering gym with your harness on (a.k.a. the sign of a novice)? Or is there a legitimate reason for equipping an aggressive tool with an adze?

—RANDYTHEMUSCLEMANSAVAGE

Randy,

I agree with you that having two hammers (or nothing at all) makes more sense for most pure waterfall ice situations. You can usually take care of all
your chopping needs with your pick. Now, if you are talking more of an alpine setting where you may need an adze for bigger projects, like chopping a bivy ledge or building a snow anchor, then having an adze on your tool might make more sense.

I remember long ago (20+ years) taking an adze to the head while climbing a long route in the Canadian Rockies. I was a bloody mess by the time that cut finally froze shut. I’m pretty sure a hammer to the head is much cleaner than an adze to the head, but both are probably worth avoiding.

As for the “disturbing trend” you mentioned of novice ice leaders using an adze, I don’t know. Maybe that’s what the gear shops are selling to new ice
climbers.

—Jeff Ward


Got a question about climbing? Submit your question to Gear Guy at rockandicegearguy@gmail.com


Also Read

Ask the Master: Double Ropes vs. Single Rope with a Tagline