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MacLeod and Muskett Open New Multi-Pitch in Shetland Islands

Dave MacLeod and Calum Muskett climbing a 350-meter new route on Nebbifeld on Foula.

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Dave MacLeod writes in a blog post about Nebbifeld, a 290-meter-tall sea cliff, on Foula, in the Shetland Islands, “I’d seen a small picture of it years ago and it looked quite terrifying – bands of overhanging sandstone, of god only knows what quality, towering for hundreds of metres. It might not be climbable at all, it might be amazing. There is only one way to find out.”

On May 19, 2018, MacLeod and Calum Muskett rapped into the base and started upward, climbing heady pitches of varying rock—some bulletproof, some terribly chossy—back to where they began.

They named their new route, Ultima Thule (“Apparently the name the Romans had for Foula, meaning the farthest land,” MacLeod writes) and graded the pitches E7 5c, 5c, 6a, 6b, 6a, 6b, 6b, 6b, 6b, 5a.


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