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Climbing

No Handed Climbing

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“Climbing is like lager or wine, and no hands is really like a liqueur or spirit. It’s a lot stronger coordination medium,” says British climber Johnny
Dawes.

Dawes has been at the cutting edge of rock climbing since the eighties. He has established some the hardest and boldest routes in Britain, such
as the rarely repeated slab The Indian Face (E9 6c).

Now at 50 years old, he is still pushing the limits of the sport by exploring the practice of no hands climbing, requiring balance, footwork
and coordination beyond compare.

In this short film by Wayne Sharrocks, Johnny Dawes works a no handed slab ascent at
Stanage Edge.

Watch Johnny Dawes – No Handed Climbing II