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Weekend Whippers

Weekend Whipper: One Foot From the Deck

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Brazilian climber Gustavo blows the anchor clip on a short route outside of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and comes close to cratering.

Dynamic belays are important, but on short routes like this one, it’s more important for the belayer to keep slack to a minimum, especially when paying
out rope for the climber to make the clip. The extra rope makes the leader vulnerable to a longer fall if he or she flubs the clip.

In this whipper, Gustavo was nearly to the ground before the rope went taut.

Balance the risks. Dynamic belays are best for when your climber is high above the ground, with good gear. If there’s a chance that the climber will hit
a ledge, bulge or even the ground, mitigate the risk with a shorter catch.

For more belay tips, read Common Belay Screw-ups and What To Do About Them.

Happy Friday and climb safe this weekend!

Watch last week’s Weekend Whipper: The Evictor (Trad Fall), Eldorado Canyon